EP

  • are Greece, Croatia, Hungary, Portugal, Cyprus, United Kingdom, and Italy.
  • according to European trade unions, in 18 countries, including Spain, wages have grown much more slowly than before the crisis.
  • only Germany, Poland and Bulgaria have had increases in real wages between 2009 and 2016 compared to the 2001-2008 period.

 protest in Brussels

seven countries of the European Union currently pay lower wages to the of eight years . In particular, between 2009 and 2016 real wages relative to the CPI have been reduced in Greece (by an average of 3.1%), Croatia (- 1%), Hungary (- 0.9%), Portugal (- 0.7%), Cyprus (- 0.6%), United Kingdom (- 0.4%) and Italy (- 0.3%).]

are a study of the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) and the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) released by UGT. The report also highlights that in 18 European countries, wages have grown much more slowly than before the crisis. Thus, the growth in real wages has been more weakly in the period 2009-2016 that between 2001-2008 in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Spain, Estonia, Finland, France, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Sweden.

annual average real wage growth has fallen from 11.2% in the period 2001-2008 up to 0.1% between the years 2009 to 2016 in Romania; from 8.8% to 1% in Lithuania, and from 10.6% to 1.2% in Latvia. Only Germany, Poland and Bulgaria have had increases in real wages between 2009 and 2016 compared to the 2001-2008 period.

the report stresses that in 2016, when real wages began to rise, declines were recorded in Belgium and remained practically at the same level in Italy, France and Greece. The CES began in February a campaign, which will run until 2018, to demand a wage increase in the EU countries. The strategic lines to follow include, among others, the consolidation of sectoral collective bargaining in the European countries and the establishment of minimum wages not less than 60% of the average wage.